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Arthur Hu's Index

(c) Arthur Hu please cite when using data from here arthurhu @ hufamily.com (no space) on how to get more complete data or complete text of these references

Contents

@@Phonics

The opposite of "Whole Language" is direct instruction of phonetics, how to speak and decode written text, and grammar, and correct spelling vs. making children "discover" and "guess" word meanings, spelling, and pronunciation. Progressives cringe at the drill and canned responses, but popular methods such as Open Court and Reading Mastery have shown remarkable result for Candian "aboriginals" (Indians) and poor African Americans, the very groups targeted by progressives.



@@Against

PHONICS IS A DISMAL FAILURE - 40% FAILURE RATE
z48\clip\2001\02\nophonic.txt
http://www.edweek.org/ew/ewstory.cfm?slug=22andrejevic.h20 Education
Week February 14, 2001 The Story of Phonics By Helen Bardeen
Andrejevic "Phonics has not served our schools well, leaving almost
40 percent of our students unable to read at even a basic level.  "

@@Cheney

z44\clip\2000\08\cheney.txt by Lynne Cheney Dallas Morning News,
Sunday, November 14, 1999 Phonics: It is a legitimate teaching
method, not a right-wing conspiracy Wife of Dick Cheney Thus, no
matter what the evidence shows to be effective, ed school ideology
condemns any teaching technique that requires students to drill or
memorize, as phonics instruction does.  The impact of this way of
thinking can be seen in many math classes, where multiplication
tables have become passe and kids are encouraged to create their own
ways of doing long division.  Science teaching, too, has been
affected.


@@Best
WHOLE LANGUAGE WON'T WORK WITHOUT PROVEN PHONICS
z55\clip\2002\02\readsci.htm Scientific American March 2002 HOW
SHOULD READING BE TAUGHT?  Author(s) Rayner, Keith; Foorman, Barbara
R.; Perfetti, Charles A.; Pesetsky, David; Seidenberg, Mark S. 
In fact, phonics works the best for disadvantaged children, despite 
bias of "progressive" and "child-centered" educators towards them.



@@General

PHONICS READERS BY END OF 1st Grade
 Open Court and Phonics game
are effective

http://www.seattletimes.com/news/local/html98/readb_021598.html
\clip\98\04\abcbatt.txt Seattle Times February 15, 1998 A battle over
the ABCs by Jolayne Houtz and Dionne Searcey Seattle Times staff
reporters

Illiteracy causes Poverty Leon Todd
MPS Board of School Directors 3447 N 47th St Milwaukee, WI 53216-3334
Ph: 414-444-9490 FAX:414-444-3997 ltodd@omnifest.uwm.edu

50% will learn using any method
20% will have difficulty
30% will have great difficulty and need explicit phonics
Only 2.5-5% of bottom 20% will  not learn from phonics

Reid Lyon, Executive Director of the National Institute of Health
says children are whole language impaired.

NICHD SAYS EXPLICIT PHONICS NEEDED FOR WEAKEST READERS
\clip\98\01\readrate.txt
http://www.basenet.net/~eagle/educate/1997/mar97/er_mar97.html#goals
Education Reporter March 1997 Declaring reading failure to be a
"public health problem," Dr. Reid Lyon noted that 80% of school
children with learning disabilities have primary deficits in reading
Whereas 50% of young children can learn no matter how they are taught
to read, 40% are labored readers and 20% have great difficulty
learning how to read. "These problems are not developmental," said
Lyon. "76% remain lousy readers if they aren't caught by nine years
of age."  Lyon is a research psychologist and chief of the learning
disabilities and child development branch at the National Institute
of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) within the National
Institutes of Health. Dr.  * Children with reading disabilities and
children of poverty seem to benefit from the same type of
instruction, i.e., explicit, systematic phonics.


@@for

z40\clip\2000\04\natread.txt
April 13, 2000
National Reading Panel Reports Combination of Teaching Phonics, Word
Sounds, Giving Feedback on Oral Reading Most Effective Way to Teach
Reading

In the largest, most comprehensive evidenced-based review ever conducted
of research on how children learn reading, a Congressionally mandated
independent panel has concluded that the most effective way to teach
children to read is through instruction that includes a combination of
methods.
A
comprehensive explanation of these two concepts is available in the NICHD
publication, Understanding Why Children Succeed or Fail at Reading,
http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/readbro.htm.
The panel found that the research conducted to date strongly supports the
concept that explicitly and systematically teaching children to manipulate
phonemes significantly improves children's reading and spelling abilities.


\clip\99\02\halfed.txt February 1999 Insight Magazine Whole Language,
Half an Education?  By Gayle M.B. Hanson It correctly points out that
passing legislation without a consequence for failure to implement is
a continuing problem.  Local districts continue to push whole
language texts and methods, regardless of teacher's desires. Thank
you, Colleen

RESEARCH BACKS PHONICS, WHOLE LANGUAGE DISCREDITED
\clip\98\14\edclip03.txt Published Monday, October 12, 1998, in the
Miami Herald Phonics reshapes the teaching of reading By DANIEL de
VISE Herald Staff Writer But of the two camps, 40 years of
accumulated research resoundingly supports phonics. And, while few
would dispute the merits of reading books, much of the philosophy
known as whole language has been disproved and discredited.


DAVE ZIFFER - FORGET "BALANCED" APPROACH
\doc\web\98\07\ziffer.txt
Spoken vocabulary is acquired automatically, but written vocabulary is
not. A typical first grader already knows over 14,000 spoken words and
learns new spoken words at a rate of between 3,000 and 5,000 per year, all
without any formal training. If his teacher spends just two years teaching
him to convert written words into spoken words (i.e. phonics), then he
automatically acquires a phenomenal reading capability because he already
knows the meanings of so many spoken words.

NOT FOR EVERYONE? 95% CAN READ IF GIVEN PHONICS 98-09-30 Articles
from The Sun | SunSpot, The Baltimore Sun online

\clip\98\13\phonread.txt NIH-sponsored studies are finding that at
least 95 percent of even the poorest readers can learn to read at
grade level if they are given early and proper instruction in
sound-letter relationships By contrast, as many as 40 percent of
school-age children remain poor readers, with half of them having
serious trouble. classroom studies involving 3,000 ... in Houston,
Tallahassee, Fla., and Albany, N.Y., which have shown that all but
the most severely disabled can learn to read at grade level. All but
5 percent of the poorest readers -- regardless of income and race --
can achieve average test scores after a year of intensive teaching 30
to 45 minutes a day in kindergarten and first grade.

BRITAIN TELLS SCHOOLS PHONICS OR ELSE
\clip\98\06\ukphon.txt London told how to teach reading By Liz
Lightfoot, Education Correspondent " in September l990 Martin Turner,
an educational psychologist, revealed that reading tests administered
to 400,000 seven-year-olds showed the biggest decline in standards
for 45 years. Other psychologists backed up his claim that a high
proportion of children referred to them with reading difficulties
were not dyslexic but had been badly taught by the new methods.  The
Government said research in English-speaking countries has proved
that structured phonics is the most effective way to teach. The new
methods are also believed to have contributed to the the
under-achievement of boys in reading compared with girls. Where
intensive phonics are used, boys achieve as well as, or better than,
girls.  "


\clip\98\05\newcl01.txt 2/16/98 Seattle Times A battle over the ABCs
2/16/98 Phonics debate divides district by Katherine Long Seattle
Times Snohomish County bureau (parent wants open court)2/16/98
Argument over methods spills over to Legislature by Roberto Sanchez
Seattle Times staff reporter

@@The Phonics  Game

Negative review of hyped game
http://www.edresearch.com/phonics.htm


@@Open Court

OPEN COURT - 93% MEET EXPECTATIONS, ZERO GAP FOR ABORIGINAL INDIANS
z48\clip\2001\04\bcopen.txt April 4, 2001 Back-to-basics reading
shows big results An Interior community school has turned around
dismal reading statistics Janet Steffenhagen Vancouver Sun A
back-to-basics reading program is being credited with drastically
improving the reading skills of primary students in a small B.C. town.


@@Race

Open Court in British Columbia completely erased differences in
racial performance between whites and aboriginal indians.

OPEN COURT - 93% MEET EXPECTATIONS, ZERO GAP FOR ABORIGINAL INDIANS
z48\clip\2001\04\bcopen.txt April 4, 2001 Back-to-basics reading
shows big results An Interior community school has turned around
dismal reading statistics Janet Steffenhagen Vancouver Sun A
back-to-basics reading program is being credited with drastically
improving the reading skills of primary students in a small B.C. town.

@@Reading Mastery SRA

..SRA's Reading Mastery series, which has been shown in extensive
research to be the most effective known method of delivering phonics
instruction.

RM A HIT IN CANADA
z53\clip\2001\10\canphon.txt Two inner-city Vancouver schools report
Reading Mastery has produced phenomenal results with children.
BASICS READING PROGRAM 'AMAZING' JANET STEFFENHAGEN Special to the
Sun Reading Mastery, one of several U.S. phonics-based reading
programs that have recently made their way into a few B.C. schools.
Three years ago only 10 to 20 per cent of Seymour students were
reading at grade level. Now that situation is reversed, with fewer
than 20 per cent of the children below standards. 
Open Court, which has won accolades from the B.C. education ministry
for its success in Chase, B.C., especially with First Nations
children.  Before, 91 per cent of kindergarten children, 89 per cent
of children in Grade 1 and 87 per cent of Grade 2s couldn't read at
expected levels. 70 per cent of students in the school are now
capable readers. 


@@Russia

Russian is very poetic, but new methods (non phonetic) are the
wrong way. 3/7/98 Russa has phonics debate. Russians veer from
phonics for boredom and creativity. Baltimore Sun

@@Slingerland

From: DaveZiffer@aol.com Dear Bruce: Slingerland Phonics is a highly
regarded Direct Instruction phonics program that is used mainly by
"special ed" teachers. It is very similar to SRA's Reading Mastery
series, which has been shown in extensive research to be the most
effective known method of delivering phonics instruction. I myself
have prefer the SRA product because in Slingerland the cues given by
the teacher are less specific (and therefore more open to confused
interpretation by the student), but I'd have no qualms about having
Slingerland used on my child. -Dave Ziffer


@@Synthetic

BBC Thursday, February 4, 1999 Published at 00:03 GMT=20 Education
C-a-t spells success in early literacy=20 The synthetic phonics
method shows remarkable gains=20


@@Systems

From:             "mcnee" 
Date sent:        Sat, 21 Feb 1998 09:29:33 -0000

At the risk of telling you what you already know, I give below the
main bits a child needs to know (of phonics) to get him safely off,
from age 4 on:

You need the 26 sounds of letters and how to blend (  zip,  cat;  flag,
past;  stamp, caravan,  hospital) then

oo  ee  sh  ch  th
ar, or     er  ir  ur
-e  (pan/pane   pet/Pete  pin/pine  cod/code   tub/tube)
-le      table/raffle       title/little
i/y    ai/ay    oi/oy
oa     ea    (cream  head   bear     pearl    heart;  steak  great   break)
Soft c,g  (ce ci cy   ge gi gy       gu...  guest)
ou/ow   au/aw
gh   ght   ough    wa,war,qua,quar,  wor     al  (also  talk)   -ine
(Pauline)  -que  (antique)
U  (blue,  cube,  music,  fruit,  new)
ph,ch   (dolphin,  echo)
-tion    -ation      -ture  (picture)
be-  re-  de-    (before  remind   defy)
ie saying ee,  ei saying ee  ei saying ay (rein)

But taxmoney keeps on being spent on creating programmes!  If you
would like to try my programme on your child, and let me know how you
get on, send me your postal address.  Mona.