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Arthur Hu's Index of Education

(c) Arthur Hu please cite when using data from here arthurhu @ hufamily.com (no space)

Contents


What's normal?
Yes - traditional standards
No - higher standards (reform)
--------------
Kindergarten
Yes
most enter not knowing A-Z 1-10    

No
All must be able to write stories
Tell rectangle from hexagon from parallelogram

4th Grade
Yes
most add, multiply 1-2 digit numbers 

No
solve statistics, probabilty
and ratio problems

8th Grade
10th Grade

Curriculum

What should be learned at each grade level? Some books, districts, and states have defined their "standards" of what should be taught, when. @@Achieve Home www.achieve.org Search standards database: http://www.achieve.org/achieve/achievestart.nsf/Search?OpenForm The goal is to survey all the different state standards. Now that the cat has gotten out of Tuckers bag of starting out with national standards, it appears the idea is to let the states pilot their standards first, and then tie them together into a national standard he and his friends can control. ACHIEVE STANDARDS: GOVERNMENT BY GOVERNOR AND CEO \clip\99\15\achieve.txt Richmond Times-Dispatch Wednesday, January 22, 1997 Collective Guvs and CEOs Make Education Policy by Ukase By Robert Holland look at Achieve's board of directors: Governors Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin (co-chair), Bob Miller of Nevada, Roy Romer of Colorado, John Engler of Michigan, George Voinovich of Ohio, and James Hunt of North Carolina; and CEOs Louis Gerstner of IBM (co-chair), John Pepper of Procter & Gamble, Robert Allen of AT&T, John Clendenin of BellSouth, George Fisher of Eastman Kodak, and Frank Shrontz of Boeing. If that cast looks familar to summit-goers, it should: This was the summit's planning committee, now enshrined to do the work of the summit. Under our federal system, we the people elect governors as the chief executives of our sovereign states. But we seem to be getting more than we bargained for -- governors acting as a collective entity to make national policy. ------------------------------------------------------- Ravitch is on board of Achieve \clip\99\16\achmath.txt www.achieve.org Achieve and Ten States Form Partnership Tying Middle School Math Teaching and Testing to Common, Internationally Challenging Standards New Materials, Training, and Exam Based on Third International Math & Science Study Will Add More Algebra, Geometry to States' Offerings Achieve is headed by Marc Tucker affliated people. From: SandyElliot The standards are written by the Regional Laboratories according to a document I found scouring for Julanne's information yesterday. And Achieve IS Tucker's and Boeing's/Shronz. I just need to dig that back out again to show you the letterhead. National Clearinghouse will enable searching standards of many states by task. @@Addison Wesley Addison Wesley Math Grade 4 (c) 1991. John Dossey was an advisor. Elementary School Mathematics Addison Wesley 1964 Grade 4-6 Eichholz Based on the "new mathematics", discourages teachers from teaching formulas before children have explored their own ways to measure area = height x width, average = sum / number. No probability at any grade level. @@Afrocentrism Afrocentric 7th Grade Humani in Berekeley. Islam helped advance women??? @@Age %%4 Child Profile Washington Dept of Health Many children can do most of these things - jump, hop on one foot, stand on one leg - cut paper with scissors - six piece puzzle - catch a large ball - button a shirt - draw recognizable pictures? - say name, age, phone number? - talk about something 2 days ago ? Henry couldn't do this at 4, but could type his name on computer %%5 - put on his own clothes - draw a person with head, body, arms, legs - recognize letters of alphabet - make up stories with dolls or toy animals - knows own address and phone number (you gotta be kidding..) @@America Reads http://www.ed.gov/inits/americareads/arc-pubs.html Checkpoints for Progress in Reading and Writing for Families and Communities K - understand stories being read aloud, alphabet, very simple words writes name, scribbles G3 - read children's books, understands main themes. correct and edits as neccesary, spelling correct G6 - fiction and nonfiction, magazines, newspapers, plot edit work to final draft, use dictionary. spelling, grammar @@Arizona \doc\web\98\09\azstand.htm Arizona Standards @@Baltimore Curriculum Project http://www.cstone.net/~bcp/BCPIntro2.htm Lesson plans 4th grade - art european medieval religious art, stained glass - science connect batteries in series and parallel, voltage, current, short circuit, fuse - science heart, heart rate, muscle @@Bellevue \clip\98\07\bellcur.txt Copyright © 1997 Horvitz Newspapers Inc. 1/7/98 Bellevue revamping curriculum Students in middle school could create 7-year program Molly O'Connor Eastside Journal Reporter "Under the new curriculum, students would also find themselves placed in classes by ability level, sometimes known as `` tracking.'' " http://www.seattletimes.com/news/local/html98/curr_012198.html \clip\98\03\midfast.txt "Middle schools go fast-track" Seattle Times Jan 21, 1998 Mike Lindblom New curriculum encourages foreign language starting in 6th grade (spanish, french in all, some Chinese, some Japanese, German to be dropped), algebra at 8th grade. @@Benedict School Curriculum guide with mayan counting system and scientists of all races http://www.ben.esu6.k12.ne.us/ben/curr.html http://www.ben.esu6.k12.ne.us/ben/science.html @@Boulder Valley Co http://bvsd.k12.co.us/curriculum @@British Columbia British Columbia K-7 Curriculum Standards (Less than WA 4th grade assessment - inexactly probability vs. compute exact ratio) @@California California 1998 Math framework (rigorous) http://www.cde.ca.gov/cilbranch/eltdiv/mathfw.htm \clip\98\02\camath\camath.htm California Challenge Standards Based Reform Initiative http://www.cde.ca.gov/challenge/ G4: \clipim\98\11\challenge\g4.htm http://www.rahul.net/dehnbase/hold/platinum-standards/ Alternative Mathematics Content Standards for grades K-12 Submitted by Bill Evers, Commissioner September 15, 1997. Parents challenge "reform math" plan for K12 math. @@Catholic Our Lady of Peace \clip\97\26\lady.txt @@College z42\clipim\2000\05\12\mathquiz.efx 6-7th grade level math test given to computer science students in community college, only 50% rose about 75% "pass" level. Graphing, percent, apply formula. @@Colorado http://www.cde.state.co.us/asindex.htm \clipim\98\11\comath.pdf Math @@Connecticut Mastery Test Objectives Mastery Test Objectives @@Core Knowledge I know it's better to know more than less, but I think these guys are going way overboard compared to traditional grade level work. Core Knowledge Home Page (Hirsch) I have been homeschooling my two kids for 6 years and I was thrilled to find the Core Knowledge books "What Your K-6 Grader Needs to Know". Core Knowledge Sequence Actual Lessons Maybe this is too much for 1st graders? 1st grade - know the solar system. Name the 13 colonies. The students will cite why the development of writing (Cuneiform) and written laws (The Code of Hammurabi) was important to the development of early civilization. G. The students will locate and distinguish between Upper and Lower Egypt. H. The students will explain the Unification of Egypt. Barbara Fortsch Core Knowledge Foundation @@Dance I'm sorry if I don't get it, but this is completely nuts. Wisconsin Standards for Dance http://www.dpi.state.wi.us/dpi/standards/pdf/dance.pdf \clip\99\14\dance.pdf By the end of grade 4 students will: A.4.1 Recognize and explore space, time, and force as the three elements of dance A.4.2 Define and maintain personal space and move safely in groups throughout the general space A.4.3 Demonstrate eight basic foot locomotor movements (walk, run, hop, jump, leap, gallop, slide, and skip) A.4.4 Demonstrate and combine nonlocomotor/axial movements (such as bend, twist, rotate, stretch, or swing) A.4.5 Explore forms of locomotion using other bases of support (such as roll, crawl, cartwheel, or slide) A.4.6 Combine various locomotor forms with directional changes (such as forward, backward, sidewards, diagonal, or turn) A.4.7 Create shapes through movement and move at low, medium, and high levels A.4.8 Demonstrate movements using various pathways (such as straight, curved, zig-zag, twisted, or turning) on the ground and in the air A.4.9 Demonstrate rhythmic awareness by moving to a musical beat and responding to changes in tempo @@Delaware Delaware New Directions http://www.dpi.state.de.us/content.html @@Florida Sunshine State Standards http://www.firn.edu/doe/curric/prek12/frame2.htm @@Fordham Foundation Fordham Foundation From: "Mike McKeown" FORDHAM REPORT: Volume 2, Number 3 March 1998 "State Mathematics Standards" by Ralph A. Raimi and Lawrence S. Braden < http://www.edexcellence.net/standards/math.html > The Thomas B. Fordham Foundation commissioned evalutations of state mathematics standards. The evaluations can be found in the .PDF file available at the address above. In all, the standards from 46 states plus the District of Columbia and Japan were examined. The the grades were A 3 B 9 C 7 D 12 F 16 This report is particularly notable in that the newly adopted California Mathematics Standards received the highest, and highest possible, rating: A. (Washington State rates an F, Oregon D) The table is found on page 32 in the acrobat viewer, which you'll have to have installed on your computer after you download the file. "If teachers and textbooks can be found to carry it through properly, this Standards outlines a program that is intellectually coherent and as practical for non-scientific citizens as for the future engineer. Whatever of 'real world' application school mathematics can have, is found here, set upon a solid basis of necessary understanding and skill. " (p 26, col 1) The report explicitly blasts standards like the NTCM which opposes memorization or even teaching of long division, and red flags several false doctrines common to the new new math, such as problem solving before basic skills. Excerpt from Alaska and California http://www.edweek.org/ew/current/31stand.h17 \clip\98\08\statstan.txt An 'A' or a 'D': State Rankings Differ Widely By Lynn Olson The way the American Federation of Teachers figures it, Michigan earns a C for the quality of its math and English standards. [intermediate] By the Council for Basic Education's reckoning, the grade rises to a B-plus. [favors easy academics, progressive values] But on the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation's report card, Michigan plummets to an F. [favors tough academic, spurns progressive values like "relate to everyday life", performance based tests] \clip\98\08\fordstan.txt http://www.edweek.org/ew/vol-17/27math.h17 3/18/98 Education Week Reviewers Disappointed in States' Mathematics and Science Standards By Millicent Lawton [Fordham Foundation] The standards states are setting for student performance in math and science are disappointingly low, a pair of studies say, and are, for the most part, unlikely to boost U.S. students' achievement. [spurns NTCM approach] @@Grade 1 Don Crawford 2001 says: they should be able to read primer text at a rate of 60 words per minute, solve addition facts at a rate of 40 problems per minute, spell 3 and 4 letter regular words as well as a few of the most common words, and so on. Such goals are achievable through direct and explicit phonics-based instruction in first grade. Chicago Board of Education By the end of first grade, students should be able to: Re-tell content of text read to them. Identify the main idea of text read independently. \clip\99\12\chic.txt http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/skul23.html Chicago Sun More kids must go to summer school June 23, 1999 BY ROSALIND ROSSI AND FRAN SPIELMAN STAFF REPORTERS 1ST GRADE - READ 15 MIN PER DAY ALPHABETIZE LIST OF 9 WORDS WRITE COMPLETE SENTENCES WRITE ANY SPOKEN WORD SUMS OVER 11-20 \DOC\WEB\98\08\hi1st.txt (This is my son's combined 1/2 class) Peter G1- who is author what is title of book Money - 2 digit sum with carry and no instruction From: Tanya Sharon One of the exit skills for first grade here is to produce and market a product. We (the first grade teachers) have decided to hold a sale late in April to raise money for a field trip and will use this opportunity to complete this exit skill activity. Can you spell estivation? Frog life cycle AG Bell kirkland @@Grade 2 %%Math Core curriculum \doc\web\98\09\math2d.txt http://www.trinity.edu/departments/education/TCKC/2math97.htm 2nd Grade geometry describing shapes by attributes (looks like mostly G3 and G4 level, this is a thematic curriculum) -measuring perimeter in inches; area in square inches -identifying solid figures: sphere, cube, pyramid, cone, cylinder, rectangular prism, hemisphere -associate solid figures with planar shape: sphere (circle) etc. -make congruent shapes and designs -identifying lines as horizontal; vertical; perpendicular; parallel -naming lines and line segments (line AB: segment CD) -identifying a line of symmetry %%Sample AG Bell 2000 "Quotation marks" reading response - 4 sentences tell about an experience you had like one of the characters in the story Question mark adjective character/concept web pan- means chaos = pandemoneum contractions can't suffix -ed -ing prefix pre- dis- pregame disobey story sequence chart begin middle end vocabulary perseverance regroup Venn diagram - what tortoise was diff, same as hare (this was a reading exercise!) numeral million Guess and check: 63 cents of pennies, nickels and dimes same dimes as pennies, 3 more nickels than dimes how many (algebra problem!) science guess length cm, mass gm, hardness penny nail fingernail http://www.arthurhu.com/images/2000/15/18/lobster.efx z42\clipim\2000\05\12\lobster.efx - reading passages Rather complex report on lobsters for a 2nd grader! Female lobsters do not take care of the newly hatched larvae. @@Grade 6 YOU GOTTA BE KIDDING. zip36\clipim\99\08\17\french6.pdf http://www.coreknowledge.org/CKproto2/resrcs/lessons/699frchrev.pdf We Have the Baker, the Baker's Wife, and the Bakers Son. We Shall Have Bread. The French Revolution, 1789 Grade Level: Grade 6 Presented by: Patricia Gray and Jeanne Federle, Sharonville Elementary, Cincinnati, OH The French Revolution will explore the extravagance of the absolute monarchs, Louis XIV, XV, and the XVI, that gave rise to a major financial crisis for the French government. [more unbelievably high standards...] @@Hillsdale MORE STANDARDS FROM HELL. Hillsdale academy 7th grade Put the following in chronological order: Julius Caesar Nero Marcus Aurelius Diocletian Constantine Pompey Augustus 1. Of the rulers mentioned above, who was the best? Why? Who was the worst? Give specific examples to support your answer. 2. DEFINE: a) Pax Romana b) Papyrus c) Oratory d) Huns @@History Chinese Americans not VA CA (state history) Columbus CA not VA Communism CA VA Franklin, Ben CA VA (as scientist) Hitler CA not VA Holocaust VA CA Irish CA not VA Japanese American Internment CA not VA King Martin Luther CA VA Lincoln CA not VA Malcolm X not CA not VA Martin Luther not CA VA Mao Tse Tung CA VA Mayas not CA VA Karl Marx not CA VA Mussolini CA not VA Napoleon CA not VA Nazi VA Slavery CA VA Stalin CA not VA Washington, Booker T CA VA Washington, George CA VA %%California http://www.cde.ca.gov/board/historya.html zip36\clip\99\15\historya.htm GRADE 10 WORLD HISTORY, CULTURE, AND GEOGRAPHY: THE MODERN WORLD 4.how the ideology of the French Revolution led France to develop from constitutional monarchy to democratic despotism to the Napoleonic empire No Karl Marx %%Virginia Virginia standards zip36\clip\99\15\history.htm http://www.pen.k12.va.us/go/Sols/history.html 9th grade makes no mention of Napoleon but lists Edict of Nantes Joan Masters thinks it's completely nuts to cover this much stuff in one year. Teaching resources http://www.pen.k12.va.us/go/VDOE/Instruction/wmstds/history.shtml @@Holt Rheinart Textbook Holt, Rheinhart and Wilson 1970 Exploring Elementary Mathematics. Probability introduced at the 5th grade, has mode, median, and mean at 5th grade. @@Illinois Illinois 4th grade curriculum 1997 Ill curr. 1897 fourth grade.part1 Illinois 4th grade curriculum part 2 Illinois 5th grade curriculum %%Science ILLINOIS STANDARDS DON'T HAVE ANY CONTENT WORDS \doc\web\99\05\illsci.txt The official Illinois standards for science are online at: http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ils/lscience.html or download the PDF version at: http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ils/science.pdf @@Japan Japan has a national standardized curriculum, but does not set specific skills A Study of Three Cultures: Germany, Japan, and the United States An Overview of the TIMSS Case Study Project http://www.pdkintl.org/kappan/kste9803.htm \clip\98\08\timss\timss.htm Phi Delta Kappan Magazine March 1998 Japanese do not set exact content standards for each grade except for Chinese characters. TRANSLATIONS OF JAPANESE TEXT BOOKS Available are English translations of Japanese math texts: "Japanese Grade 7 (8 or 9) Mathematics" from UCSMP 5835 S. Kimbark Chicago, IL 60637 (773) 702-1130 ucsmp@cicero.uchicago.edu From: ucsmp@uchicago.edu Date sent: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 15:05:56 -0600 To: arthurhu @ hufamily.com (no space) Subject: Re: Japananse math texts Mr. Hu: Yes, we do have translations of Japanese texts. Grades 7, 8, and 9 are $19.00 each and are available from our office. If you would like to order any of these, please send a check or money order made payable to the University of Chicago and a letter specifying which texts you would like. Other UCSMP translations of Japanese texts which are available through the American Mathematical Society are: Mathematics 1: Japanese Grade 10 Mathematics 2: Japanese Grade 11 Algebra and Geometry: Japanese Grade 11 Basic Analysis: Japanese Grade 11 You can get information about ordering these texts by contacting the AMS directly at (800) 556-7774. If you would like more in-depth information about the content of any of these textbooks, please email me your postal address and I can mail you an order form which includes content headings. @@Kentucky Kentucky Core Content for Asssessment @@Kindergarten Traditional kindergarten was an introduction to school, and structured play not academics. Now with the call for reform and "higher standards" some kindergarteners are expected to know how to read, pick out the author from the title and table of contents, write letters and stories, and read sheet music rests and eighth notes, abaa patterns, know trapezoids from parallelograms. What Kindergarteners can actually do based on surveys: 98% K recognize numbers shapes spring 94% K count to 10 US 94% K pick out shapes US 88% K Understand relative sizes spring 84% K write own name 78% K count to 20 US 66% K know abcs age 5 US 57% 4yr know most letters <50% K Utah know letters, words 37% 3yr count to 20 27% 3yr recognize most or all letters 22% 3yr write own name 18% K add subtract spring 4% K add subtract start Newswire Parent Child June 2002 p. 6 Natl Center for Ed Statistics study 20,000 children, 8,000 teachers What kinbsergarteners can do start / spring Add Subtract 4 / 18 Sequencing 23 / 58 Relative sizes 58 / 88 Recog Num Shape 94 / 98 (approx from chart) %%Advanced KINDERGARTEN FROM HELL NOW STANDARD IN CA z40\clipim\2000\03\27\kinder\kinder.htm http://www.ocregister.com/education/kind026w.shtml Kindergarten is no longer kids' play EDUCATION: State standards have students learning math and reading. March 26, 2000 Story by MARIA SACCHETTI The Orange County Register en class expecting finger painting, nap time and alphabet letters. Instead, she got computers, geometry and writing in journals. "I was stunned," said Vitarelli, a kindergarten teacher for the past four years at Eastshore Elementary in Irvine. Following are some questions kindergartners face at Eastshore Elementary School: • 1. Show a clock face at 3 o'clock. Do you recognize the time to the hour? • 2. Give the child three different colored blocks such as red, blue and yellow. Show six different ways to arrange them from top to bottom. • 3. Can you recognize the sounds in this word? What is the vowel? Hat (h/a/t) CA-K NEED TO SPOT TABLE OF CONTENTS, AUTHOR, WRITE ABOUT EXPERIENCES z50\priv\2001\07\cakind.txt http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-000056812jul11.story?coll=la%2Dheadlines%2Dcalifornia July 11, 2001 Legislation Seeking Compulsory Kindergarten Faces Budget Obstacle Jul 11, 2001 MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER Kindergarten is no longer child's play. By the end of their kindergarten year, California pupils are now expected to be able to locate a book's title, table of contents, author and illustrator. They are expected to be able to write about experiences and people, recognize when an estimate is reasonable and use information to make a graph. But kindergarten is not required. %%Average Don Crawford says: all kindergarteners ought to finish the year being able to name and write all the letters of the alphabet, know the sounds of most of the consonants, be able to read a few CVC words, be able to write their name, be able to count by wrote to 20, recognize and write the numbers to ten, count objects to ten, recognize and name a few basic geometric shapes, etc. www.educationnews.org 2/9/2000 Salt Lake Tribune Pupils Not Primed to Read BY KATHERINE KAPOS SALT LAKE TRIBUNE Most Utah children enter kindergarten unable to identify letters, recognize alphabet sounds or grasp the concept of a word -- and many graduate nine months later without having learned those skills. Two new reports show many kindergartners lack these basic reading fundamentals and underscore the need for better teacher training, Utah State Office of Education officials say. The results also point out the need for more parental involvement. z39\clip\2000\02\kinder.txt 94% OF KINDERGARTENERS COUNT TO 10, KNOW SHAPES Published Friday, February 18, 2000 Contra Costa Times Government to track 22,000 tots The six-year [ed department] study will try to determine how best to help poor youngsters catch up to their classmates Nearly all, 94 percent, can count to 10 and pick out shapes when they start kindergarten. Two in three know their ABC's. KIDS ENTER SCHOOL WITH ACADEMIC GAP z48\clip\2001\03\kindskil.txt http://washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A44324-2001Mar8?language=printer Poorer Children Least Ready for School By Manuel Perez-Rivas Washington Post Staff Writer Friday, March 9, 2001; Page B01 The achievement gap that vexes Montgomery County schools begins even before students start kindergarten One-third of the children living in poverty -- and more than half of those with limited English skills -- could recognize no more than 11 capital or lower-case letters of the alphabet, the county report found. By contrast, only one in 10 of all other students scored at such a low level. %%Lake Washington z39\clipim\2000\01\31\kmusic.efx Quarter notes, eigth notes and quarter rests in Kindergarten???? (this was written out in notation!) q = quarter note r = quarter rest e = eighth note 1) qqqq 2) qqqr 3) (wrong) qrqrq right is qrqr 4) qqrr 4) qqeeq I just dug this up from old papers from last year, I thought quarter rests were crazy in first grade but KINDERGARTEN?? I kid you not, this is what my kindergartender brought back home last year. He got 1 wrong out of five, they were expected to write quarter notes (dark ball with line) eighth notes (dark ball, one flag) and quarter rests (funny z's) Anybody else get this insanity?? Linda half day Kinder has 2nd grade level reading, no pictures, open response comprehension questions require searching 9 sentences. Ratio. AAB patterns Peter Share Sheet 20 looks like 2nd grade reading level to be read "with fair fluency" Peter's impossible homework assignment %%Reading IS AGE FOUR TOO EARLY TO START READING FUNDAMENTALS http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000859662412044&rtmo=qss9bLp9&atmo=YYYYYYYp&pg=/et/99/6/23/nrrr23.html \clip\99\12\read4.txt Electronic Telegraph ISSUE 1489 Wednesday 23 June 1999 Four-year-olds 'are not too young to be taught three Rs' By Liz Lightfoot, Education Correspondent FEARS that children are being harmed by being taught to read and count too early were dismissed by school inspectors and the Government yesterday. Ofsted had found no evidence that four-year-olds in primary school reception classes were being damaged emotionally or educationally, ... "[opponents] have pointed to high educational standards in several European countries where children attend kindergartens and do not start school until the age of six or seven." Comment - how about Lake Washington experiment where all kindergarteners get 45 min reading homework and phonics flashcards every night and 80% read at 80th percentile or better by end of year? %%Russia Traditional Russians start school at age 7, now starting at 5 or 6 as in the west. %%Seattle 2000 Standards include - tell parallelogram from a trapezoid - write stories and letters - write a page of gibberish about the number of cats next to a house %%Skills ONLY 7% OF TEACHERS VS 59% OF PARENTS BELIEVE COUNT TO 20 ESSENTIAL FOR PRE-K http://nces.ed.gov/pubs/93257.html October 1995 READINESS FOR KINDERGARTEN: PARENT AND TEACHER BELIEFS For a free single copy of this report, contact The National Data Resource Center either at ndrc@pcci.com or by phone at (703) 845-3151. Refer to publication number: NCES 93-257 \DOC\WEB\2000\03\kindbel.htm TABLE 1.--PERCENTAGE OF PRESCHOOLERS' PARENTS AND PUBLIC SCHOOL KINDERGARTEN TEACHERS WHO RATE SELECTED CHILD CHARACTERISTICS AS "ESSENTIAL" OR "VERY IMPORTANT" TO BEING READY TO START KINDERGARTEN: 1993 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- | Preschoolers' | Kindergarten | parents | teachers Child characteristic |---------------------------------------------- | Estimate | Standard | Estimate | Standard | | error | | error ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Estimated number (thousands)....| 8,441 | 44 | 119 | 19 Communicates needs, wants, and | | | | thoughts verbally.............| 92% | 0.5% | 84% | 1.1% Takes turns and shares..........| 92 | 0.5 | 56 | 1.4 Is enthusiastic and curious in | | | | approaching new activities....| 84 | 0.7 | 76 | 1.7 Sits still and pays attention...| 80 | 0.9 | 42 | 1.1 Is able to use pencils or paint | | | | brushes.......................| 65 | 1.0 | 21 | 1.3 Can count to 20 or more.........| 59 | 0.9 | 7 | 0.8 Knows the letters of the | | | | alphabet......................| 58 | 0.8 | 10 | 0.8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- NOTE: The unit of analysis in the NHES: 93 is the child. The base for the percentages is the number of preschoolers, not the number of parents. The FRSS is based on an independent sample of public school kindergarten teachers. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, FRSS Kindergarten Teacher Survey of Student Readiness and National Household Education Survey (parents), spring 1993. NATIONAL CENTER FOR EDUCATION STATISTICS Statistical Analysis Report February 2000 Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Class of 1998- 99,... http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2000/2000070.pdf - size 391.5K As children enter kindergarten for the first time, 66 percent pass reading proficiency level one (recognizing their letters); 29 percent pass level two (beginning sounds); 17 percent pass level three (ending sounds); 2 percent pass level four (sight words); and 1 percent pass level five (words in context) (table 5). When they enter kindergarten, 94 percent of first-time kindergartners pass mathematics proficiency level one (reading numerals, recognizing shapes and counting to 10); 58 percent pass level two (reading numerals, counting beyond 10, sequencing patterns and using nonstandard units of length to compare objects); 20 percent pass level three (number sequence, reading two digit numerals, identification of the ordinal position of an object and solving a word problem); 4 percent pass level four (includes calculating sums up to 10 and relationships of numbers in sequence); and under 1 percent pass level five (problemsolving using multiplication and division and number patterns) (table 6). page 35 Table 2.—Mean reading t-scores of first-time kindergartners, and percentage distribution of quartile scores, by child and family characteristics: Fall 1998 Characteristic Mean t-score 0-25 percent 26-50 percent 51-75 percent 76-100 percent Total 50 25 25 25 25 Child's sex Male 49 29 25 24 22 Female 51 21 25 26 28 Child's age at entry Born Jan. – Aug. 1992 53 15 25 26 34 Born Sep. – Dec. 1992 52 19 22 27 32 Born Jan. – Apr. 1993 51 24 24 25 27 Born May – Aug. 1993 48 30 27 23 20 Born Sep. – Dec. 1993 47 33 28 23 16 Mother's education Less than high school 43 52 26 16 6 High school diploma or equivalent 48 32 28 24 16 Some college, including vocational/technical 51 21 27 26 26 Bachelor’s degree or higher 56 8 18 28 46 Family type Single mother 47 36 29 21 14 Single father 48 31 31 22 16 Two parent 51 22 24 26 28 Welfare receipt Utilized AFDC 44 49 27 16 8 Never utilized AFDC 50 22 25 26 27 Primary language spoken in home Non-English 46 44 22 18 16 English 50 25 25 25 25 Child's race/ethnicity White, non-Hispanic 52 18 24 28 30 Black, non-Hispanic 47 34 30 21 15 Asian 55 13 24 24 39 Hispanic 46 42 24 19 15 Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 48 33 28 17 22 American Indian/Alaska Native 42 57 23 11 9 More than one race, non-Hispanic 49 31 23 23 23 Child’s race/ethnicity by maternal education Maternal education: High school diploma/equivalent or more White, non-Hispanic 53 16 24 29 31 Black, non-Hispanic 48 30 30 22 18 Asian 56 11 21 25 43 Hispanic 48 35 24 22 19 Maternal education: Less than high school diploma or equivalent White, non-Hispanic 45 43 28 21 8 Black, non-Hispanic 43 52 28 16 4 Asian 48 28 41 19 12 Hispanic 41 64 22 10 4 NOTE: Estimates based on first-time kindergartners who were assessed in English (approximately 19 percent of Asian children and approximately 30 percent of Hispanic children were not assessed). Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998–99, Fall 1998. p. 36 math scores Table 3.—Mean mathematics t-scores of first-time kindergartners, and percentage distribution of quartile scores, by child and family characteristics: Fall 1998 Ranked by % in top 25% Child's race/ethnicity To q1 q2 q3 q4 Asian 54 13 25 24 38 1.2 White, non-Hispanic 52 18 23 27 32 1.0 More than one race, non-Hispanic 49 31 24 25 20 -1.6 Hispanic 47 40 26 20 14 -2.2 Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 47 34 27 27 12 -2.6 Black, non-Hispanic 46 39 30 21 10 -3.2 American Indian/Alaska Native 43 50 26 15 9 -3.5 Characteristic Mean t-score 0-25 percent 26-50 percent 51-75 percent 76-100 percent Total 50 25 25 25 25 Child's sex Male 50 26 24 24 26 Female 50 24 26 26 24 Child's age at entry Born Jan. – Aug. 1992 55 13 18 23 46 Born Sep. – Dec. 1992 53 17 22 26 35 Born Jan. – Apr. 1993 51 22 26 26 26 Born May – Aug. 1993 48 32 27 24 17 Born Sep. – Dec. 1993 46 41 27 20 12 Mother's education Less than high school 43 53 25 15 7 High school diploma or equivalent 48 32 28 23 17 Some college, including vocational/technical 51 21 27 28 24 Bachelor’s degree or higher 56 18 18 19 45 Family type Single mother 46 37 28 21 14 Single father 48 31 29 19 21 Two parent 51 21 24 26 29 Welfare receipt Utilized AFDC 44 50 27 16 7 Never utilized AFDC 51 22 25 26 27 Primary language spoken in home Non-English 47 38 26 19 17 English 50 25 25 25 25 Child’s race/ethnicity by maternal education Maternal education: High school diploma/equivalent or more White, non-Hispanic 53 16 23 28 33 Black, non-Hispanic 47 36 30 22 12 Asian 55 12 24 23 41 Hispanic 48 32 27 24 17 Maternal education: Less than high school diploma or equivalent White, non-Hispanic 45 45 25 19 11 Black, non-Hispanic 42 56 27 13 4 Asian 50 18 36 28 18 Hispanic 42 60 24 11 5 NOTE: Estimates based on first-time kindergartners who were assessed in English (approximately 19 percent of Asian children and approximately 30 percent of Hispanic children were not assessed). Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998–99, Fall 1998. KINDERGARTEN FROM PLAY TO ACADEMIC BOOT CAMP http://www.ed.gov/databases/ERIC_Digests/ed293630.html ED293630 87 The Shifting Kindergarten Curriculum. Author: Egertson, Harriet A. The shift from play- and group adjustment-oriented settings to kindergarten classrooms characterized by direct teaching of discrete skills and specific expectations for achievement is being reinforced by recent calls for reform of public education (Elksind, 1986). Many preschools and child care centers try to teach content identified by kindergarten teachers as prerequisite to kindergarten success. It is not uncommon now to find child care and preschool settings in which children spend prolonged periods sitting at tables trying to complete pencil and paper tasks which would be inappropriate even for substantially older children. http://www.ed.gov/databases/ERIC_Digests/ed291514.html ED291514 87 Readiness for Kindergarten. ERIC Digest. Author: Nurss, Joanne R. Kindergarten was usually a half-day program whose curriculum and activities were separate from the rest of the school, and whose purpose was to prepare the child for first grade. Now kindergarten is an integral part of the elementary school's curriculum and the focus has shifted from social to cognitive or academic (Nurss and Hodges, 1982). %%Writing Kindergarteners are now expected to write sentences independently. AG Bell 1999 kirkland write sentences with flah cards teacher writes for student Holy Family Kirkland March 2000 Hall: Kindergarten writers I like to play jump rope I like to play soccer I like to play with my cousin's dog I like to play baseball @@Laboratory Science "Sun sets, and brains expand" Seattle Times Sept 28, 1998 p. B3 Mike Lindblom 90% of Issaquah School District high schoolers take laboratory science. Nationally, 24 percent of 1994 graduates studied physics, 2.4 percent reached advanced-placement physics according to the National Center for Education Statistics @@Lafayette Parish School Board Standards Links http://www.lft.k12.la.us/sites/pdev/standards.htm \clip\97\25\lafay.htm @@Logo By age 2, most toddlers can ask by brand name, they learn 200 brands / logos by grade 1 - James McNeal Author The Kids Market (Paramount) scholastic Parent and Child June Aug 2002 @@Los Angeles Los Angeles vs. CA math standards \clip\98\09\lausdstd.htm Sample - La makes no mention of triangle, CA has triangles at every grade. @@Louisiana Louisiana Contents Standards @@Massachusetts Standards http://www.doe.mass.edu/edreform/standards/ parent thinks they are a joke Frameworks http://www.doe.mass.edu/doedocs/frameworks/ Really awful fuzzy math standards: http://www.doe.mass.edu/doedocs/frameworks/Mathtoc.html @@McRel Standards Database http://www.mcrel.org/standards-benchmarks/ @@Minneapolis http://www.mpls.k12.mn.us/currstandards.html @@Minnesota The High Standards define what students should know and be able to do. http://children.state.mn.us/grad/highstandards.htm#math %%bad Minnesota "High" Standards omits multiplication and division almost completely, only introduces addition at grade 4. number sense K-3 counting K-3 place value G4-5 addition (normally 1st grade) G4-5 multiplication 1 digit (normally 2/3rd grade) G4-5 simple fractions G6-8 fractions G6-8 exponents G6-8 prime numbers G6-8 factors G6-8 scientific notation G6-8 ratio G6-8 proportion G6-8 percent G6-8 transform algebraic expressions High triginometry *** NOT EXPECTED OF MINNESOTA STUDENTS *** NA multiplication multiple digit NA division, any digits NA square roots TEACHER SAYS LANGUAGE STANDARDS ARE EVEN WORSE Date: Thu, 29 Oct 98 15:36:51 -060 Hey! I'm a Minnesota person - a teacher, even - and I can't make head nor tail of any of it. Our school had been involved with these "high" standards for 5 years now, and all it does is get worse. If you think the math standards are bad, take a look at the Read Write Listen stuff - it's incredible. And it's the LAW. Mary Olson @@Music AG Bell start instruments 4th grade, participate in orchestra starting after 1st year on instrument, 1st graders learn what a quarter rest is. Federal Way 2nd grade sing so do mi la, orchestrate orf instruments in 2 First piano lesson more on accelerated music. Nebraska 1940s To teach all children to sing and to love music To teach the child to read simple music at sight. @@National National Science Education Standards @@Modern Red Schoolhouse http://www.mrsh.org/pub2.html $10 for standards document List of state science frameworks @@NAEP NAEP Mathematics Framework clip/97/25/naep/mathcont.html Skills to be assessesd by grade level. Says you should not assess conversions even within the same system in the 4th grade, let alone between systems. @@NCTM National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1989. @@Nebraska http://nde4.nde.state.ne.us/IPS/Issu/mathSTAND.html \clip\98\19\nvmath.htm Nebraska math standards from 1940s. Decimal math left for middle school, now introduced at grade 4/5. Ratio at grade 8 now introduced grade 5 or 6 (or kindergarten!) @@Nevada "essential if students are to become successful citizens, life-long learners, and competitive workers in a global market place." Math \clip\98\19\nvmath.htm http://www.leg.state.nv.us/interim/nonlegcom/academicstandards/Misc/Standards/Math.htm Language Arts \clip\98\19\nvlang.htm http://www.leg.state.nv.us/interim/nonlegcom/academicstandards/Misc/Standards/ELA.htm Comment - very detailed and ambitious, includes memorization of addition / subtraction / multiplication tables to 12 x 12. @@New Jersey New Jersey Mathematics Curriculum Framework http://dimacs.rutgers.edu/nj_math_coalition/framework.html @@New Standards ALL SHOULD BE ABLE TO DESIGN, BUILD ELECTRIC CAR Tucker Coxxing Standards for our schools - like the 4th frade bikr trailer project, there is a high school level project to design and build an environmentally correct electric car with no plans and donated motor and batteries. This is absurd, not even MIT students are required to construct a device this complex as a class project, where do you find an automotive enginner to design such aa thing? Student claims to already be an expert in shop. Clearly a fantasy, not "standard setting" example of what all should klink Kansas, once upon a time: The following is from a note by one Avis Carlson, recalling the eigth-grade "final exam" she had to pass in order to graduate from her (one-room) rural Kansas grade school, ca. 1910. "Recently I ran into the questions which qualified me for my eigth grade diploma. The questions on that examination in that primitive, one-room school, taught be a person who had never attended a high school, positively daze me. The orthography quiz asked us to spell 20 words, including "abbreviated," "obscene," "elucidation," "assassination," and "animosity." ... Two of arithmetics ten questions asked us to find the interest on an 8 percent note for $900 running for two years, two months, six days; also to reduce three pecks, five quarts, one pint to bushels. @@Pennsylvania PA district has very low math expectations The school district where my children attend school is Cumberland Valley School District in Mechanicsburg, PA. This district is supposed to be one of the best in the area. Gloria Hoffman @@Peninsula Gig Harbor WA http://www.peninsula.wednet.edu/purple.htm#12345 @@PUMAS Based on United States national content guidelines, the entire subject matter of K-12 mathematics and science has been divided into broad curriculum areas, called Science and Math "Standards." file: \clip\99\02\mathskill.htm http://pumas.jpl.nasa.gov/math_skills.html http://pumas.jpl.nasa.gov/SC_std_search.html @@Reading Standards \clip\99\10\edclip01.txt Los Angeles Times Sunday, March 21, 1999 READING BY 9 What Your Child Should Know and When @@Renton http://www.renton.wednet.edu/doi/default.htm#Mathematics Still has traditional high school math series: but adopted Quest 2000 fuzzy math for K-5 Mathematics Elementary Mathematics K-5 Middle School Mathematics 6-8 Algebra 1,2s,3,4s Algebra 1a1b.2a2b Applied Mathematics Basic Geometry Calculus 1,2 Computer Programming Consumer Education Consumer Mathematics Geometry 1,2 Intermediate Algebra 3,4 Math Analysis / Trigonometry 1,2 Math Foundations 1,2,3,4 Math Maintenance 1 WEB SITE DEVELOPMENT 1 @@Russia z41\clipim\2000\04\28\russ\russ.htm http://www-personal.uiowa.edu/~wharte/rustext.html Translation of 6th grade russian text about circles, PI 558. Draw angles measuring 35º and 80º such that their vertices are the same and they have a common side. Provide two examples. 559. On a 6th-grade math test 25% of the class earned an A, 35% a B, 30% a C, and 10% a D. Draw a bar graph depicting the grade distribution. 560. Calculate: 1) 0.75 ÷ 5/6 + 2.5 · 2/5 - 1 ÷ 11/9 2) ((45/12 - 313/24) · 4/7 + 110/17 (31/18 - 27/12)) ÷ 31/3 561. The famous Greek mathematician Archimedes determined that 310/71< p < 31/7. Compare the circumference of a circle using 310/71 and 31/7 as p if the circle's radius is 497 cm.. From: ucsmp@uchicago.edu we also publish a series of Russian translations for grades 1-3 (our grades 2-4). >> You can get information about ordering these texts by contacting the AMS >> directly at (800) 556-7774. \clip\98\04\euclid.txt Los Angeles Times Friday, February 6, 1998 A PLEA IN DEFENSE OF EUCLIDEAN GEOMETRY Math education: Fewer classes require proofs--more whittling away of exposure to logic and critical thinking. By BARRY SIMON Russian 5th grade = us middle school. Russian programmer told me algebra is in middle school and calculus towards start of high school. @@Physical Education Incredibly detailed PE standards for grade 3 and 4 z52\doc\web\2001\09\grade4.txt z52\clipim\2001\09\24\grade4.gif 4th Grade Level Physical Education Skills Juggle 2 beanbags in one hand or 3 scarves Dribble and pass puck with control Shoot to 7-8 ft basket z52\doc\web\2001\09\grade3.txt z52\clipim\2001\09\24\grade3.gif 3rd Grade Level Physical Education Skills Denying space, defensive "ready position" frog stands, tripods @@Physics Maine expects 8th graders to know Newton's 3 laws of motion. CA: PERIODIC TABLE = 3RD GRADE?? \clip\98\14\scica.txt Subject: [k-12science] Columinist Joanne Jacobs on Calif. Science Standards Published Thursday, October 15, 1998, in the San Jose Mercury News OVER my 11-year-old nephew's bed hangs the poster that first went up when he was sleeping in a crib: the periodic table of elements. I first encountered the periodic table in high school chemistry. Seaborg's scientists insisted that third-graders be told that, ``Science experiments show that all matter is made of the elements that are displayed on the periodic table of the elements.'' NSES - ENVIRONMENT YES, GRAVITY NO. \clip\98\13\science.txt Science Snoots Wage War On Real Standards DEBRA J. SAUNDERS Friday, October 2, 1998 ©1998 San Francisco Chronicle URL: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1998/10 /02/ED34782.DTL 1996 National Science Education Standards (NSES), which, Alberts helped draft and prefers. Unlike California's standards, which make grade-specific recommendations from grades K-8, the NSES ``standards'' -- if you can call them that -- come in blocks of grades: K-4, 5-8, 9-12. They provide no standards as to when children should learn what. K-4 kids ``have little understanding of gravity,'' ``do not understand that water exists as a gas when it boils or evaporates,'' and Nonetheless, the document asserted that most K-4 kids ``recognize pollution as an environmental issue, scarcity as a resource issue, and crowded classrooms or schools as population problems.'' AAAS Benchmarks for Science Literacy are flawed, lax \doc\web\98\06\scistan.txt Message: http://mathematicallycorrect.com/stanmetz.htm ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Testimony of Stan Metzenberg, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology California State University Northridge Before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Science, Subcommittee on Basic Research July 23, 1998 @@Preschool z40\clipim\2000\03\13\prekind.pdf http://nces.ed.gov/pubs95/95280.html Approaching Kindergarten: A Look at Preschoolers in the United States October 1995 (NCES 95-280) Executive Summary Kindergarten is now a nearly universal experience for children in the United States: 98 percent of children attend kindergarten prior to entering first grade. However, the population of children that comes to kindergarten is increasingly diverse p. 29 Characteristic All preschoolers 3-year-olds 4-year-olds 5-year-olds Estimate s.e. Estimate s.e. Estimate s.e. Estimate s.e. (In thousands) All 3yr 4yr 5yr Literacy-numeracy indicators (Percent) Identifies primary colors . . . . . . . . . . . 78 .8 69 1.3 84 1.1 89 1.8 Recognizes most or all letters. . . . . . . . . 44 .7 27 1.3 57 1.2 66 2.7 Counts to 20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 .8 37 1.3 62 1.3 78 2.4 Pretends to read or reads stories . . . . . . . 70 .9 65 1.3 73 1.4 79 2.0 Writes own name, even if some backwards 50 .7 22 1.1 70 1.2 84 2.5 Small motor indicators Can button his/her clothes . . . . . . . . .. . 89 .5 83 .9 93 .6 94 1.6 Holds pencil properly . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 .5 87 1.0 94 .6 94 1.5 Writes/draws rather than scribbles . . . . .. . 66 .8 50 1.3 78 1.0 84 1.7 Health status Excellent, very good . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 88 .7 88 .8 88 1.0 87 1.6 Good, fair or poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 .7 12 .8 12 1.0 13 1.6 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Household Education Survey, 1993. Table 3.— Percentage of 4-year-old preschoolers with reported signs of emerging literacy and numeracy 1 and average number of these accomplishments reported, by child and family characteristics: 1993 Characteristic Estimated number of children (thousands) A Identifies primary colors B Recognizes most or all letters C Counts to 20 D Pretends to read or reads stories E Writes own name F Mean number of accomp's Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Mean s.e. Color Letter Count Read Name total Total . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 3,713 84 1.1 57 1.2 62 1.3 73 1.4 70 1.2 3.5 .04 Child's sex Male . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,954 82 1.4 52 1.8 59 2.0 70 1.7 66 1.7 3.3 .06 Female . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,760 87 1.4 63 1.6 66 1.9 76 1.8 75 1.6 3.7 .06 Child's race/ethnicity White, non-Hispanic. . . . . 2,507 91 .9 61 1.4 66 1.4 77 1.4 74 1.4 3.7 .04 Black, non-Hispanic . . . . . 572 73 3.0 58 3.3 67 3.0 65 2.7 63 3.4 3.3 .10 Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480 61 3.4 31 3.3 39 3.6 58 3.6 59 3.6 2.5 .12 Other races . . . . . . . . . . . 154 85 4.4 70 5.4 60 5.3 74 4.8 79 4.4 3.7 .15 Parents in household Two parents . . . . . . . . . . 2,678 88 1.1 59 1.5 63 1.7 76 1.4 72 1.3 3.6 .05 Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,035 75 2.2 53 2.5 59 2.7 65 2.2 66 2.8 3.2 .07 Mother married at child's birth Yes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,781 87 1.1 59 1.5 64 1.5 75 1.5 73 1.2 3.6 .05 No . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 932 74 2.6 52 2.8 56 2.6 67 2.9 62 3.2 3.1 .09 Mother's primary language 2 English . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,412 87 1.1 60 1.2 65 1.4 74 1.4 72 1.3 3.6 .04 Other language . . . . . . . . 302 55 4.3 25 3.8 28 4.1 54 4.6 54 4.4 2.2 .15 Mother's highest education 2 Less than high school . . . 470 56 3.6 33 3.5 36 3.5 55 4.3 51 3.1 2.3 .09 High school diploma or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,243 88 1.1 61 1.3 66 1.5 75 1.3 73 1.2 3.6 .05 Poverty Status Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 994 69 2.8 43 2.7 48 2.8 63 3.1 54 2.7 2.8 .10 Non-Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,720 90 1.0 62 1.2 68 1.4 76 1.3 76 1.2 3.7 .04 Risk factors 3 None . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,813 93 1.0 66 1.4 71 1.7 78 1.4 78 1.4 3.9 .05 One factor . . . . . . . . . . . . 757 87 2.1 54 2.8 60 2.4 75 2.8 72 2.3 3.5 .08 Two factors . . . . . . . . . . . 603 76 3.3 49 3.9 56 3.4 71 3.1 61 3.3 3.1 .12 Three or more factors . . . 539 59 3.4 40 3.4 43 3.3 53 3.8 53 3.6 2.5 .11 Child ever attended center-based program Yes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,718 89 1.0 63 1.3 69 1.4 77 1.4 77 1.3 3.7 .04 No . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 995 71 2.5 41 2.5 44 2.9 62 2.7 53 2.5 2.7 .09 1 As reported by parents. 2 If the mother or female guardian is not a member of the household, the father or male guardian's education or primary language is given. 3 Risk factors include single parenthood, unmarried motherhood, minority-language status, low maternal education, and poverty. NOTE: s.e. is standard error. Four-year-old preschoolers are those who have not yet entered kindergarten or primary school. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Household Education Survey, 1993. Table 4.— Percentage of 4-year-old preschoolers with reported small motor accomplishments 1 and average number of accomplishments reported, by child and family characteristics: 1993 Note - 97% blacks vs 92% of whites can button their clothes. Blacks are ahead in small motor accomplishments, but behind in academic. Characteristic Estimated number of children (thousands) Can button clothes Holds pencil properly Writes/draws rather than scribble Mean number of accomplishments Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Mean s.e. Total . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,713 93 .6 94 .6 78 1.0 2.7 .02 Child's sex Male . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,954 91 .9 92 .9 74 1.6 2.6 .02 Female . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,760 96 .8 96 .7 82 1.4 2.7 .02 Child's race/ethnicity White, non-Hispanic . . . . . . 2,507 92 .8 93 .7 79 1.3 2.7 .02 Black, non-Hispanic . . . . . . . 572 97 .8 96 1.2 79 3.0 2.7 .03 Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480 94 1.4 94 1.6 67 2.9 2.5 .04 Other races . . . . . .. . . . . . 154 90 4.0 92 3.2 86 4.7 2.7 .09 Parents in household Two parents . . . . . .. . . . . 2,678 93 .8 94 .6 79 1.1 2.7 .02 Other . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 1,035 94 .9 92 1.6 76 2.7 2.6 .04 Mother married at child's birth Yes . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 2,781 93 .7 93 .7 78 1.1 2.6 .02 No . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 932 94 1.2 95 1.1 77 2.4 2.7 .03 Mother's primary language 2 English . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,412 93 .6 94 .6 79 1.1 2.7 .02 Other language . . . . . . . . . . 302 93 2.0 95 1.8 67 4.1 2.5 .05 Mother's highest education 2 Less than high school . . . . . 470 95 1.4 95 1.3 71 3.6 2.6 .04 High school diploma or higher . . . . . . . . . . . 3,243 93 .6 94 .6 79 1.0 2.7 .02 Poverty Status Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 994 95 1.1 94 1.2 72 2.4 2.6 .03 Non-Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,720 92 .7 94 .6 80 1.1 2.7 .02 Risk factors 3 None . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,813 92 .9 94 .8 81 1.3 2.7 .02 One factor . . . . . . . . . . . 757 94 1.5 94 1.1 79 3.0 2.7 .04 Two factors . . . . . . . . . . . 603 94 1.5 93 1.8 71 2.8 2.6 .04 Three or more factors . . . . . . 539 95 1.5 95 1.4 74 3.3 2.7 .04 Child ever attended center-based program Yes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,718 93 .7 94 .6 80 1.4 2.7 .02 No . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 995 94 1.1 93 1.1 71 2.4 2.6 .03 1 As reported by parents. 2 If the mother or female guardian is not a member of the household, the father or male guardian's education or primary language is given. 3 Risk factors include single parenthood, unmarried motherhood, minority-language status, low maternal education, and poverty. NOTE: s.e. is standard error. Four-year-old preschoolers are those who have not yet entered kindergarten or primary school. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Household Education Survey, 1993. "The differences by race and Hispanic origin that were observed for literacy-numeracy accomplishments are not observed, in general, for the selected small motor skills. Black children are slightly more likely than white children to be able to button their clothes, but are very similar to white children in the percentages that hold a pencil properly or write or draw rather than scribble." Table 5.— Percentage of 4-year-old preschoolers with reported physical activity-attention difficulties 1 and average number of these difficulties reported, by child and family characteristics: 1993 Characteristic Estimated number of children (thousands) Restless/fidgets Short attention span Has temper tantrums Trips or falls easily Mean no. of difficulties Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Percent s.e. Mean s.e. Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,713 29 1.1 23 1.1 23 1.2 13 .8 .9 .03 Child's sex Male . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,954 34 1.8 26 1.7 24 1.5 14 1.2 1.0 .05 Female . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,760 23 1.5 20 1.3 22 1.6 11 .9 .8 .03 Child's race/ethnicity restl attn temper trips mean White, non-Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,507 25 1.2 20 1.2 20 1.3 11 .9 .8 .03 Black, non-Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572 31 3.5 24 3.3 24 2.6 15 2.6 .9 .08 Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480 45 3.4 41 3.5 37 3.5 18 2.4 1.4 .09 Other races . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 30 5.9 21 5.6 25 5.2 19 5.7 1.0 .15 Parents in household Two parents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,678 27 1.1 20 1.1 20 1.2 11 .9 .8 .03 Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,035 35 2.7 30 2.5 32 2.6 17 1.8 1.1 .07 @@Science @@Seattle Seattle unveils new standards, kindergarteners are supposed to write stories, 7th graders solve algebra problems. z39\clipim\99\12\12\seastan.efx Images of kindergartener writing gibberish as standard setting. Jane Goetz explains about the cat exercise. @@Standards Setting SETTING STANDARDS BY LYNCH MOB \doc\web\98\08\stanset.txt Why it's a bad idea to even have a commmittee set curriculum standards @@Survey http://www.edweek.org/ew/current/31stand.h17 \clip\98\08\statstan.txt An 'A' or a 'D': State Rankings Differ Widely By Lynn Olson The way the American Federation of Teachers figures it, Michigan earns a C for the quality of its math and English standards. [intermediate] By the Council for Basic Education's reckoning, the grade rises to a B-plus. [favors easy academics, progressive values] But on the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation's report card, Michigan plummets to an F. [favors tough academic, spurns progressive values like "relate to everyday life", performance based tests] http://www.edweek.org/ew/current/31stans1.h17 \clip\98\08\stan\stan.htm Grading the Standards Sample: Math AFT CBE Fordham Florida A C+ D @@Texas %%TEKS Performance based standards -make presentations, ads Donna Gardner "Create media products to include a billboard, cereal box, short editorial, agand a three-minute documentary or print ad to engage specific audiences." "Create, present, test, and revise a project and analyze a response, using data-gathering techniques such as questionnaires, group discussions, and feedback forms." @@Vermont Vermont's Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities http://www.state.vt.us/educ/stand/page3.htm Math Standards http://www.state.vt.us/educ/stand/smtstand.htm \clip\98\10\smtstand.htm @@Virginia Virginia Standards of Learning Very highly regarded back to basic skills. Does not include difficult 4th grade WA skills such as conditional probability, proportional geometry, frequency histograms. @@Washington State Washington State's published benchmarks are relatively low and easy, but the 1997 assessment at the 4th grade level includes tasks found only at the 8th and 10th grade levels. Washington State Essential Learning Requirements Manual (.pdf file) \clip\97\25\waessn.pdf Math page 43 Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements/Benchmarks (EALR) .html files Math benchmarks side by side zip37\clip\99\17\math.htm http://www.k12.wa.us/reform/ealr/standards/math.html Math Benchmarks 1=G4,2=G8,3=G10 .txt @@Wisconsin Wisconsin Standards are a joke WRITING WISCONSIN'S EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS Little Room for Dissent by Leah Vukmir State of Wisconsin, Office of the Governor "Wisconsin's Model Academic Standards" [developed by the Governor's Council on Model Academic Standards] English / Language Arts: http://www.wisgov.state.wi.us/MSEng.htm Mathematics: http://www.wisgov.state.wi.us/MSMath.htm \clip\97\29\wisc\msmath.htm Science: http://www.wisgov.state.wi.us/MSSci.htm Social Studies: http://www.wisgov.state.wi.us/MSSocial.htm San Marino School District 5th grade http://www.san-marino.k12.ca.us/~valentine/fifth/fifthcu.html Marie Murphy School 6th grade \clip\97\21\murphy6.htm Wilmette Illinois http://www.avoca.k12.il.us/murphy/academics/sixth/math/index.html Sixth grade students are in a seventh grade HBJ Mathematics Plus textbook. In Chapter 2, Data and Statistics, students will create and analyze a variety of graphs including bar graphs, box and whisker graphs, line graphs, circle graphs, line plots, and histograms. In the culminating activity students will form a survey, administer it, and then graph the results. In 1996, the Illinois Tax Foundation cited our students as being the top performers in the state over the past three years as measured by the Illinois Goal Assessment program. Elk Grove Curriculum schedule, by grade http://www.elk-grove.k12.il.us/bookshelf/curr/ @@Writing %%Grade 4 (intrusive?) nightly 4th grade writing assignments